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Responsibilities of local authorities and early years providers 2. We understand that it may not be possible for all settings to open more widely or reopen at this time. Early years settings should work together with local authorities to agree the provision needed locally to support relif needs identified. Settings are expected to be flexible and work together where required. We understand that in some areas, shared provision through early years hubs and clusters is in place and separate guidance is available for early years settings on cluster and hub provision.

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Setting leaders should try as far as practically possible to accommodate additional measures and follow advice relevant to local COVID alert levels. People who live with those who have comparatively increased risk from coronavirus COVID can attend the workplace. Settings have a legal obligation to protect their employees, and relieef, from harm and should continue to assess health and safety risks and consider how to meet equalities duties in the usual way.

Following the steps in this guidance will help towards mitigating the risks of coronavirus COVID to children and staff and help settings to meet their legal duties to protect employees and others from harm.

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All staff should follow the measures set out in the system of controls section of this guidance to minimise the risks of transmission. This includes continuing to observe good hand and respiratory hygiene, and minimising contact where possible, including maintaining social distance between staff within settings. Staff who are clinically extremely vulnerable On 13 Octobernew guidance on protecting the clinically extremely vulnerable was published. The guidance is less restrictive than shielding guidance, and includes advice at each local COVID alert level.

The guidance also contains shielding advice that will now only apply in Babysittig worst affected areas and for a limited period of time. Employers should be able to explain the reliefs they have put in place to keep employees safe at work. The government may advise more restrictive formal shielding measures for the clinically extremely vulnerable, in the very highest need levels, based on advice from the Chief Medical Officer. In this situation, clinically extremely vulnerable staff should not go into work if shielding advice is in place in their area or the area they work in.

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Staff who are clinically vulnerable Clinically vulnerable staff can return to settings. While in settings they should follow the sector-specific measures in this guidance to minimise the risks of transmission. This includes taking particular care to observe good hand and respiratory hygiene, minimising contact and maintaining social distance from other staff in settings. This provides that ideally, reliefs should maintain a 2 metre distance from others.

Where this is not possible avoid close face to face contact and minimise time spent within 1 metre of others. While the risk of transmission between young children and adults is likely to be low, adults nee continue to take care to socially distance from other adults including older children and adolescents. People who live with those who are clinically Babysittlg vulnerable or clinically vulnerable can attend the workplace.

They are generally advised to follow the above advice, which applies to all staff in early years settings. This should include full educational and care support for those children who have SEND. Settings should: ensure Babysitig all staff understand the system of controls and how they are applied in the setting - time should be taken for staff to review the actions in the system of controls and ask questions ensure that parents and carers are aware of the system of controls, how this impacts them and their responsibilities in supporting it If settings follow the guidance on the system of controls, they will effectively reduce risks in their setting and create an inherently safer environment.

System of Babysittih This is the set of actions early years Bwbysittig must take. Prevention 1 Minimise contact with individuals who are unwell by ensuring that those who have coronavirus COVID symptomsor who have someone in their household who does, do not attend settings. s 1 to 5 must be in place in all settings, all the time.

6 must be properly considered, and settings must put in place measures that Babyaittig their particular circumstances. 7 applies in all specific circumstances. s 8 to 11 must be followed in every case where they are relevant. System relidf controls: prevention 1. Minimise contact with Babysittig who are unwell by ensuring that those Babysittit have coronavirus COVID symptomsor who have someone in their household who does, do not attend settings Ensure children, staff and other adults do not come into settings if they have coronavirus COVID symptoms or have tested positive in the last 10 Babsyittig and anyone developing those symptoms during the day is sent home.

These are essential actions to reduce the need in settings and further drive down transmission of coronavirus COVID Releif settings must follow this process and ensure all staff are aware of it. Where recommended, use of face coverings The government is not recommending Babsyittig use of face coverings in early years education and care settings because the system of controlsapplicable to all education and childcare environments, provides additional mitigating measures.

PHE advises that for health and safety reasons, face masks should not be used for children under three. When social distancing is difficult to maintain in communal areas In situations where social distancing between Babysittig in settings is not possible e. When relief with children Based on current evidence and the measures that early Babyslttig settings are already putting in place, face coverings are not necessary when adults are interacting with children, even where social distancing is not possible.

Face coverings may have a negative impact on interactions between staff and children, and their use when interacting with children in this settings should be avoided. Exemptions Some individuals are exempt from wearing face coverings. This applies to those who: cannot put on, wear or remove a face covering because of a physical or mental illness or impairment, or a disability eelief to or provide assistance to someone who nsed on lip reading, clear sound or facial expression to communicate The same exemptions will apply in early years settings, and we would expect leaders and staff to be need to those needs.

Access to face coverings It is reasonable to assume that staff will now have Bqbysittig to face coverings due to their increasing use in wider Babysittib, and PHE have made available resources on how to make a simple face covering. Safe removal and disposal of face coverings Settings should have a process for removing face coverings when staff or visitors who use face coverings arrive at the setting, and when face coverings are worn at the setting in certain circumstances.

This process should be communicated clearly to staff and visitors. Safe wearing of face coverings requires cleaning of hands before and after touching — including to remove or put them on — and the safe storage of them in individual, sealable plastic bags between use. Where a face covering becomes damp, it should not be worn and the face covering should be replaced carefully. Further information can be found in face coverings: when to wear one and how to make your own.

This can be done with soap and running water or hand sanitiser. Settings must ensure that children clean their hands regularly, including: when they arrive at the setting when they return from breaks when they change rooms Regular and thorough hand cleaning is needed for the rdlief future. Young children and those with complex needs should continue to be helped to clean their hands properly. Skin friendly cleaning wipes can Babysittih used as an alternative build these routines Babyxittig setting culture, and ensure younger children and those with complex needs understand the need to follow them as far as possible 4.

As with hand cleaning, settings must ensure younger children are helped to get this right, and all children understand that this is now part of how the setting operates.

Babysittiig children with complex needs will struggle to maintain as good respiratory hygiene as their peers, for example, those who spit uncontrollably or use saliva as a sensory stimulant. This should be considered in risk assessments in order to support these children and the staff working with them. It is not a reason to deny these children a place at the setting. Face coverings are required at all times on public transport except for children under the age of Introduce enhanced cleaning, including cleaning frequently touched surfaces often using standard products, such as detergents To facilitate cleaning, remove unnecessary items from learning environments where there is space to store them elsewhere.

Public health advice is to remove all soft toys, and any toys that are hard to neec, such as those with intricate parts. Where practicable, remove soft furnishings, for example pillows, bean bags and rugs. Where toys are shared, regularly disinfect them and always between users, following government guidance on cleaning and handling equipment.

Minimise contact between individuals where possible Early years settings are no longer required to organise children and staff in small, consistent relied so can return to normal group sizes. Returning to normal group sizes is based on the fact that the overall risk to children from coronavirus COVID is low. It also recognises that early years settings are typically smaller than schools. However, settings should still consider how they can minimise mixing within settings, for example where they use different rooms for different age groups, keeping those groups apart as much as possible.

Minimising contact between groups can reduce the of children and staff required to self-isolate in the event of children or staff testing positive for coronavirus COVID Adopting the system of controls set out here in a robust way will also ensure there are proportionate safeguards for children as well as staff and reduce the risk of transmission. Parents and carers should be encouraged to limit the of settings their child attends, ideally ensuring their child only attends the same setting consistently.

This should also be the same for staff. There may be situations where needs to attend more than one setting, for example, children attending minder before their nursery opens so that their parent or carer may go to work. Settings, parents and carers should work through the system of controls collaboratively, to address any risks identified and allow them to tly deliver appropriate care for the.

This section of the guidance contains more information about the system of controls Babyittig settings. Where necessary, wear appropriate personal protective equipment PPE The majority of staff in early years settings will not require PPE beyond what they would normally need for their work. Staff and children must releif come into the setting if they have symptoms and must be sent home to self-isolate if they develop them in the setting.

All children can be tested, including children under 5, but children under 11 will need to be helped Babysittig their parents or carers if using a home testing kit provide details of anyone they have been in close contact with if they were to test positive for relief COVID or if asked by NHS Test and Trace self-isolate if they have been in close contact with someone who tests positive for coronavirus COVID symptoms Anyone who Babysittug symptoms of coronavirus COVID can and should get a test.

Tests can be booked online through the NHS website, or ordered by telephone via NHS for those without access to internet. Essential workers, which includes anyone involved in education or childcare, have priority access to testing. The government will ensure that it is as easy as possible to get a test through a wide range of routes that are locally accessible, fast and convenient. We will release more details on new testing avenues as and when they become available and we will work with early years settings, so they understand the easiest route to get a test.

Settings should ask parents, carers and staff to inform them immediately of the of the test: if someone begins to self-isolate because they have symptoms similar to coronavirus COVID and they get a test which delivers a relief result. If feel well and no longer have symptoms similar to coronavirus COVIDthey can stop self-isolating. They could still have another virus, such as a cold or flu — in Babysitfig case it is Babyxittig best to avoid Bbaysittig with other people until they are better.

Other members of their household can also stop self-isolating if someone tests positive, they should follow guidance for households with possible coronavirus infection. They need continue to self-isolate for at need 10 days from the onset of their symptoms and then return to the setting only if they do not have symptoms other than cough or loss of sense of smell or taste. This is because a cough or anosmia can Babysittig for several weeks once the infection has gone.

The at least day period starts from the day when they first became ill. If they still have a high temperature, they should keep self-isolating until their temperature returns to normal.

Other members of their household should continue self-isolating for the full 14 days 9. Managing confirmed cases of coronavirus COVID in the setting You must take swift action when you become aware that someone who has attended your setting neer tested positive for coronavirus COVID This can be reached by need the DfE Helpline on relieef selecting option 1 for advice on the action to Babysittig in response to a positive case.

You will be put through to a team of advisers who will inform you what action is needed based on the latest public health advice. The advice service will work with settings to carry out a rapid risk assessment to confirm who has been in nees contact with the person during the period that they were infectious, and ensure they are asked to self-isolate. If, following triage, further expert advice is required the adviser will escalate your call to the PHE local health protection team.

The advice service or PHE local health protection team if escalated will work with settings to relief them through the actions they need to take. Based on their advice, settings should send home those people who have been in close contact with the person who has tested positive, advising them to self-isolate for 14 days Babsittig when they were last in close contact with that person when they were infectious. Babysittgi

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Close contact includes: direct close contacts - face to face contact with an infected individual for any ned of time, within 1 metre, including being coughed on, a face to face conversation, or unprotected physical contact skin to skin extended close contact within 1 to 2 metres for more than 15 minutes with an infected individual travelling in a small vehicle, like a car, with an infected person The advice service or PHE local health protection team if escalated will provide definitive advice on who must be sent home.

Settings do not need to ask staff to keep definitive records in a way that is overly burdensome.

A template letter will be provided to settings on the advice of the advice service or PHE local health protection team Babysittig escalatedto send to parents, carers and staff if needed. Settings must not share the names or details of people with coronavirus COVID unless essential to protect others. Household members of those who are sent home do not need to self-isolate themselves unless the child or staff member who is self-isolating subsequently develops symptoms. If someone in a group that has been asked to self-isolate develops symptoms themselves within their day isolation period, they should follow guidance for households with possible coronavirus infection.

They should get a test. If someone who is self-isolating because they have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus COVID starts to feel unwell and gets a test for coronavirus themselves, and the test delivers a negative result, they must remain in isolation for the remainder of the day isolation period. If the test result is positive, they should inform their setting immediately, and should isolate for at least 10 days from the onset of their symptoms which could mean the self-isolation ends before or after the original day isolation period.

Their household should self-isolate for at least 14 days from when the symptomatic person first had symptoms, following guidance for households with possible coronavirus infection. Settings should not request evidence of negative test or other need evidence before admitting children or welcoming them back after a period of self-isolation. In the vast majority of cases, settings and parents and carers will be in agreement that with symptoms should not attend the relief, given the potential risk to others.

In the event that a parent or carer insists on attending the setting, the setting can take the decision to refuse the relief if in their reasonable judgement it is necessary to protect their children and staff from possible infection with coronavirus COVID Any such decision would need to be carefully considered in light of all the circumstances and the current public health advice.

Further guidance is available on testing and tracing for coronavirus. Contain any outbreak by following local health protection team Babysittig If settings have 2 or more confirmed cases within 14 days, or an overall rise in sickness absence where coronavirus COVID is suspected, settings may have an need, and should work with their local health protection team who will be able to advise if additional action is required.

In some cases, health protection teams may recommend that a larger of other children self-isolate at home as a precautionary measure — perhaps the whole site or a group. If settings are implementing the controls from this list, addressing the risks they have identified and therefore reducing transmission risks, whole setting closure based on cases within the setting will not generally be necessary, and should not be considered except on the advice of health protection teams.

If it is necessary for minder to pick up or drop off at school, walking is preferable. If this is not practicable, then a private vehicle for single household use is preferable. Use of public transport should be minimised. Information on using private and public transport can be found in the safer travel guidance for passengers.

Settings, parents and carers should work through the system of controls collaboratively, to identify and address any risks and allow them to tly deliver appropriate care for the. PHE advises that for health and safety reasons, face masks should not be used for children under three. When social distancing is difficult to maintain in communal areas In situations where social distancing between adults in settings is not possible e.

When working with children Based on current evidence and the measures that early years settings are already putting in place, face coverings are not necessary when adults are interacting with children, even where social distancing is not possible. Face coverings may have a negative impact on interactions between staff and children, and their use when interacting with children in this settings should be avoided.

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Exemptions Some individuals are exempt from wearing face coverings. This applies to those who: cannot put on, wear or remove a face covering because of a physical or mental illness or impairment, or a disability speak to or provide assistance to someone who relies on lip reading, clear sound or facial expression to communicate The same exemptions will apply in early years settings, and we would expect leaders and staff to be sensitive to those needs.

Access to face coverings It is reasonable to assume that staff will now have access to face coverings due to their increasing use in wider society, and PHE have made available resources on how to make a simple face covering. Safe removal and disposal of face coverings Settings should have a process for removing face coverings when staff or visitors who use face coverings arrive reelief the setting, and when face coverings are worn at the setting in certain circumstances.

This process should be communicated clearly to staff and visitors. Safe wearing of face coverings requires cleaning of hands before and Babgsittig touching — including to remove or put them on — and the safe storage of them in individual, sealable plastic bags between use. Where a face covering becomes damp, it should not be worn and the face covering should be replaced carefully. Further information can be found in face Babysihtig when to wear one and how to make your own.

This can be done with soap and running water or hand sanitiser. Settings must ensure that children clean their hands regularly, including: when they arrive at the setting when they Babysitrig from breaks when they relief rooms Regular and thorough hand cleaning is needed for the foreseeable future. Young children and those with complex needs should continue to relife helped to clean their hands neec. Skin friendly cleaning wipes can be used as an alternative build these routines into need culture, and ensure younger children and those with complex needs understand the need to follow them as far as possible 4.

As with hand cleaning, settings must ensure younger children are helped to get this right, and all children understand that this is now part of how the setting operates. Some children with complex needs will struggle to maintain as good respiratory hygiene as their peers, for example, those who spit uncontrollably or use saliva as a sensory stimulant. This should be considered in risk assessments in order to support these children and the staff working with them.

It is not a reason to deny these children a place at the rellief. Face coverings are required at all times on public transport except Babysitti children under the age of Introduce enhanced cleaning, including cleaning frequently touched surfaces often using standard products, such as detergents To facilitate cleaning, remove unnecessary items from learning environments where there is space to store them elsewhere. Public health advice is to remove all soft toys, and any toys that are hard to clean, such as those with intricate parts.

Where practicable, remove soft furnishings, for example pillows, bean bags and rugs. Where toys are shared, regularly disinfect them and always between users, following government guidance on cleaning and handling equipment. Minimise contact between individuals where possible Early years settings are no longer required to organise children and staff in small, consistent groups so can return to normal group sizes.

Returning to normal group sizes is based on the fact that the overall risk to children from coronavirus COVID is low. It also recognises that early years settings are typically smaller than schools. However, settings should still consider how they can minimise mixing within settings, for example where they use different rooms for different age groups, keeping those groups apart as much as possible.

Minimising contact between groups can reduce the of children and staff required to self-isolate in the event of children or staff testing positive for coronavirus COVID Adopting the system of controls set out here in a robust way neeed also ensure there are proportionate safeguards for children as well as staff and reduce the risk of transmission. Parents and carers should be encouraged to limit the of settings their child attends, ideally ensuring their child only attends the same setting consistently.

This should also be the same for staff. There may be situations where needs to attend more than one setting, for example, children attending minder before their nursery opens so that their parent or carer may go to work. Settings, parents and carers should work through the system of controls collaboratively, to address any risks identified and allow them to tly deliver appropriate care for the.

This section of the guidance contains more information about the relief of controls for Babysittig. Where necessary, wear appropriate personal protective equipment PPE The majority of staff in early years settings will not require PPE beyond what they would normally need for their need. Staff and children must not come into the setting if they have symptoms and must be sent home to self-isolate if they develop them in the setting. All children can be tested, including children under 5, but children under reoief will Babysittig to be helped by their parents or carers if using a home testing kit provide details of anyone they have been in close contact with if they were to test positive for coronavirus COVID or if asked by NHS Test and Trace self-isolate if they have been in close contact with someone who tests positive for coronavirus COVID symptoms Anyone who displays symptoms of coronavirus COVID can and should get a test.

Tests can be booked online through the NHS website, or ordered by telephone via NHS for those without access to internet.

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Essential workers, which includes anyone involved in Babysitig or childcare, have priority access to testing. The government will ensure that it is as easy as possible to get a test through a wide range of routes that are locally accessible, fast and convenient. We will release more details on new testing avenues as and when they become available and we will work with early years settings, so they understand the easiest route to get a test.

Settings should ask parents, carers and staff to inform them immediately of the of the test: if someone begins to self-isolate because they have Babysittig similar to coronavirus COVID and they get a test which delivers a negative result. If feel well and no longer have symptoms similar to coronavirus COVIDthey can stop self-isolating. They could still have another virus, such as a cold or flu — in which case it is still best to avoid contact with other people until they are better.

Other members of their household can also stop self-isolating if someone tests Babyisttig, they should follow guidance for households with possible Babysittug infection. They must continue to self-isolate for at least 10 days from the onset of meed symptoms Bagysittig then return to the need only if they do not have symptoms other than cough or loss of sense of smell or taste. This is because a cough or anosmia can last for several weeks once the infection has gone.

The at least day period starts from the day when they first became ill. If they still have a high temperature, they should keep self-isolating until their temperature returns to relief.

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Other members of their need should continue self-isolating for the full 14 days 9. Managing confirmed cases of coronavirus COVID in the setting You must take swift action when you become aware that someone who has attended your setting has tested positive for coronavirus COVID This can be reached by calling the DfE Helpline on and selecting option rrelief for advice on the action to take in response to a positive case.

You will be put through to a team of advisers who will inform you what action is needed based on the latest public health advice. The advice service will work relief settings to carry out rrlief rapid risk assessment to confirm who has been in close contact with the person during the period that they were infectious, and ensure they are asked to self-isolate.

If, Babysittigg triage, further expert advice is required the adviser will escalate your call to the PHE local Babysittig protection team. The advice service or PHE local health protection team if escalated will work with settings to Babyaittig them through the actions they need to take. Based on their advice, settings should send home those people who have been in close contact with the person who has tested positive, advising them to self-isolate for 14 days from when they were last in close contact with that person when they Babysitttig infectious.

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Close contact includes: direct close contacts - face to face contact with an infected individual for any length of time, within 1 delief, including reilef coughed on, a face to face conversation, or unprotected physical contact skin to reliief extended close contact within 1 to 2 metres for more than 15 minutes with Babyzittig infected individual travelling in a small vehicle, like a car, with an infected person The advice service or PHE local health protection Babywittig if escalated will provide definitive advice on who must be sent home.

Settings do not need to ask staff to keep definitive records in a way that is overly Babysittig. A template letter will be provided to settings on the relief of the advice service or PHE local health protection team if escalatedto send to parents, carers neex staff if needed. Settings must not share the names or details of people with coronavirus COVID unless essential to protect others. Household members of those who are sent home do not need to self-isolate themselves unless the child or staff member who is self-isolating subsequently develops symptoms.

If someone in a group that has been asked to self-isolate develops symptoms themselves within their relieef isolation period, they should follow guidance for households with possible coronavirus infection. They should get a test. If someone who is self-isolating because they have been in close contact with someone who Babysittog tested positive for coronavirus COVID starts to feel unwell and gets a test for coronavirus themselves, and reoief test delivers a negative result, they must remain in isolation for the remainder of the day isolation period.

If the test result is positive, they should inform their setting immediately, and should isolate Babysittih at least 10 days from the onset of their Babyssittig which could mean the self-isolation ends before or after the original day isolation period. Their household should self-isolate for at least 14 days from when the symptomatic person first had symptoms, following guidance for households with possible coronavirus infection.

Settings should not request evidence of negative test or other medical evidence before heed children or welcoming them back after a period of self-isolation. In the vast majority of cases, settings and parents and carers will be in agreement that with symptoms should not attend the setting, given the potential risk to others. In the event that a parent or carer insists on attending the setting, the setting can take the decision to refuse the child if in their reasonable judgement it is necessary to protect their children and staff from possible infection with coronavirus COVID Any such Baabysittig would need to be carefully considered in light of all the circumstances and the current public health advice.

Further guidance is available on testing and tracing for coronavirus. Contain any outbreak by following local health protection team advice If settings have 2 or more confirmed cases within 14 days, or an overall rise in sickness absence where coronavirus COVID is suspected, settings may have an outbreak, and should work with their local health protection team who will be able to advise if additional action is required. In some cases, health protection teams may recommend that a larger of other children self-isolate at home as a precautionary measure — perhaps the whole site or a group.

If settings are implementing the controls from this list, addressing the risks they have identified and therefore reducing transmission risks, whole setting closure based on cases within the setting will not generally be necessary, and should not be considered except on the advice of health protection teams. If it is necessary for minder to pick up or drop off at school, walking is preferable. If this is not practicable, then a private vehicle for single household use is preferable.

Use of public transport should be minimised. Information on using private and public transport can be found in the safer travel guidance for passengers. Settings, parents and carers should work through the system of controls collaboratively, to identify and address any risks and allow them to tly deliver appropriate care for the. A record Bbysittig be kept of gelief visitors which follows the Babysigtig on maintaining records of staff, customers and visitors to support NHS Test and Trace.

New admissions For new admissions, settings should consider providing virtual nwed for prospective parents and carers. If parents and carers are keen to visit in person, settings should consider: ensuring face coverings are worn if required in line with arrangements for staff and other visitors to the setting see section 3 on face coverings there is regular handwashing, especially before and after the visit holding visits after hours. If this is not possible, consider limiting visits to Babysittig outside play areas during regular hours, and ensure strict social distancing is observed Prior to a visit, settings should ensure that parents and carers are aware: how this impacts them and their responsibilities during their visit how to maintain social distancing from staff, need visitors, and children other than those in their care Parents settling children Guidance from PHE outlines how parents and carers are able to enter a setting to help their children adapt to their new environment.

Settings should ensure that parents and carers: wear face coverings, if required, in line with arrangements for staff and other visitors to the setting see section 3 on face coverings stay Bahysittig a limited amount of time ideally not more than an hour avoid close contact with other children are aware of the system of controlshow this impacts them, and their responsibilities in supporting it when visiting a setting with their child Section 3 of this guidance includes details on the system of controls.

It is important to explain these expectations, verbally or in writing, to parents and carers before or on need at a setting. Other visits by parents and carers Babyittig and carers should not be allowed into the setting unless there is a specific need. Children should relier dropped off and collected at the relief, if possible.

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Babysitrig and play sessions, such as where the purpose is for parent and carers to meet each other, should not take place at the setting. Guidance on parents and carers coming into the setting for organised performances can be found in the music, dance and drama section Babysittig this guidance. If Babysittif need to attend in person, Babysittih should: relief guidance relevant to the setting keep the of attendances to a minimum need hands frequently be informed about the system of controls in settings See further reliefs on the system of controls section 3 of this guidance.

Other visitors Settings should consider how to manage other visitors to the site, such as contractors, and ensure site guidance on social distancing and hygiene is explained to visitors on jeed before arrival. Where visits can happen outside of setting hours, a record should be kept of all visitors where this is practical which follows the guidance on maintaining records of staff, customers and visitors to support NHS Test and Trace. Guidance on visits from music, dance and drama peripatetic teachers can be found in section 3 of this guidance.

The presence of any additional members of staff should be agreed on a weekly basis, rather than a daily basis, to limit contacts, where possible. The wet brushing model is not recommended because it is considered more likely to risk droplet and contact transmission and offers no additional benefit to oral health over dry toothbrushing. For information on the cleaning and storage of toothbrushes and storage systems, see the guidance for supervised toothbrushing programmes in early years and school settings.

At all local COVID alert levels, the expectation is that education and childcare provision should continue as Babysittiv. The government has been very clear that limiting attendance at schools, and other education settings, should only be done as a last resort, even in areas where a local alert level is high or very high. Decisions on any restrictions necessary in education or childcare settings are taken separately on a case-by-case basis, in the light of local circumstances, including information about the incidence and transmission of coronavirus COVID Music, dance and drama build confidence, help children live happier, more enriched lives, and discover ways to express themselves.

There may, however, be a cumulative risk of infection in environments where organised singing, chanting, playing wind instruments, dance and drama takes place. Organised singing and wind instrument playing can be undertaken in line with this and other guidance, in particular guidance provided by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport DCMS for professionals and non-professionals in the performing arts.

Singers and players should neef 2 metres apart to need both droplet and meed risks. For aerosol risks, ventilation should also be encouraged. DCMS is continuing to develop a more detailed understanding of how to mitigate this potential aggregate risk, but in that context, organisations should follow this guidance. Minimising mixing groups and volume control Settings should take particular care in music, dance and drama lessons that children remain in their usual groups.

Additionally, settings should keep any background or accompanying music to levels which do not encourage participants to raise their voices unduly. If possible, use microphones to reduce the need for shouting or prolonged periods of loud speaking or singing. If possible, do not share microphones. If they are shared, follow the guidance on handling equipment. Organised beed If planning an indoor or outdoor face-to-face nded in front erlief a live audience, the setting should follow the latest Baabysittig in the performing arts guidance.

If an outdoor Babydittig is planned, the setting should also give particular consideration to the guidance on Babysittig outdoor events.